Eagle Bicycles 1896

UNIT TRANSPORTATION REVOLUTIONIZED.
Taking it the world over, there is no doubt but that the present is the age of the bicycle. The number now in daily use is legion. Yet we are confident that this increase in their use is but the beginning; the first awaking into a realization of the part the modern bicycle will yet play in the history of the world.
The growth of cities can even now be partially accounted for by the vast increase in the use of cycles from a utilitarian point of view—why not, then, the future growth of empires ?

Even at the present time, in foreign countries where mountains must first be overcome be-fore fertile plateaus and populous cities are reached, bicycles are superseding other modes of transportation. In such countries, where imports must first be transported in small cases on mule back, bicycles with wheels and fittings removed are easily and cheaply transferred. In some countries where machinery is un-obtainable and it is impossible to make roads of sufficient width for carriages, paths suitable for bicycle riding are being constructed with comparative ease.

Statistics show that the export shipments of bicycles from the United States have in-creased wonderfully during the past year and—what is more remarkable—into countries, where many suppose bicycle riding to be yet an unheard of mode of travel. There is always a cause and an effect. One cause not to be overlooked is the pinnacle to which a few American makers have raised the quality and consequent speed and durability of their cycles. Certain American bicycles are now in greater demand in foreign countries and even in England than home productions.
One of the most novel yet popular and satisfactory machines, is manufactured by the Eagle
Bicycle Mfg. Co., Torrington, Conn., U. S. A.

While in the main their machines are similar in outline to other standard bicycles, extreme fineness in detail construction is noticeable; and, furthermore, Eagle Bicycles may be obtained, when ordered, fitted with their patented Aluminum Rims. These rims are especially adapted for inner tube tires which are easily detached and repaired. The rims, while very light, are extremely rigid. They do not corrode and are not affected either by moisture or heat.

All tubing used in the construction of their highest priced machines is cold swaged, tapered and reinforced at the joints. This is an innovation and illustrates the high point of excellence to which American machines have lately been brought. The success of the Eagle Bicycle Mfg. Co.
has been remarkable. Some of their machines are now being used by the mounted police of New York, and shipments of Eagle Bicycles with Aluminum Rims and Cold Swaged Frames are being made to all parts of the world. Their immense factory at Torrington, Conn., devoted exclusively to the manufacture of high grade bicycles, is wonderful, in view of its special adaptation to the purpose, and the costly machinery employed. —Adv -- in Scientific American 1896, July 25